Being an Unforgivably Protracted Debunking of George Bernard Shaw’s Views of Islam

I mentioned in the passing, in an earlier post, that I had come across a bizarre interview between George Bernard Shaw and a Saudi mystic. Firstly, a correction: the mystic in question is not Saudi as I had initially thought, but was born in Meerut, India; he was a Sufi Sheikh by the name of His Eminence Maulana Mohammed Abdul Aleem Siddiqui and was born in 1892. Here he is, looking splendid, and there is Mr Shaw himself, also looking quite splendid. In fact, when the two met, His Eminence would have been 43, while Shaw himself would have been a ripe old 79.

I wanted to write something on this interview because it has really a rather curious legacy on the internet…. Googling “george bernard shaw islam” will, in fact, bring you right to the very interview that I came across in the archive, which is faithfully reproduced in full right here. The interview, to set the record straight, is in a periodical published by the All Malaya Muslim Missionary Society in Singapore called the Genuine Islam; the interview itself was conducted while George Bernard Shaw was in Mombasa sometime between the 10th and 20th of April, 1935, and the interview was published in the January number of Vol. 1 (1936) of the periodical, which is, as far as I can ascertain, the only volume that was ever published. So far, so good.

Being The Part Where The Muslim Websites Love Bernard Shaw

However, you’ll quickly find that the most quoted part of that interview is not, in fact, any part of the interview itself, which consists for the most part of His Eminence burbling amicably on about finer points of Islamic theology (read for yourself), while Mr Shaw listens and interjects with the occasional question. It is rather from a paragraph that is excerpted out of the main body of the interview into its own quote box — except that this paragraph appears nowhere in the interview itself. It is this same paragraph that has been quoted, in all the links I provided above and more, roughly in the following few ways, labelled for convenient reference. In its most popular form:

[A] I have always held the religion of Muhammad in high estimation because of its wonderful vitality. It is the only religion which appears to me to possess that assimilating capacity to the changing phase of existence which can make itself appeal to every age. I have studied him – the wonderful man and in my opinion far from being an anti-Christ, he must be called the Saviour of Humanity. I believe that if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring it the much needed peace and happiness: I have prophesied about the faith of Muhammad that it would be acceptable to the Europe of tomorrow as it is beginning to be acceptable to the Europe of today.

Also:

[B] If any religion had the chance of ruling over England, nay Europe, within the next hundred years, it could be Islam.

I have always held the religion of Muhammad in high estimation because of its wonderful vitality. It is the only religion which appears to me to possess the assimilating capacity to changing phase of existence, which can make itself appeal to every age.

Being The Part Where Truer Things Prevail

As you might ascertain from the way the quote appears and the sites it appears on, Muslims seem rather gleeful about the thumbs-up from such a prominent Western infidel as GBS. I would like, however, to give you the full, unabridged version of this quote, as it appears in the periodical itself, and it is as follows:

[C] I have always held the religion of Muhammad in high estimation because of its wonderful vitality. It is the only religion which appears to me to possess that assimilating capability to the changing phase of existence which can make itself appeal to every age. [1] The world must doubtless attach high value to the predictions of great men like me. I have prophesied about the faith of Muhammad that it would be acceptable to the Europe of tomorrow as it is beginning to be acceptable to the Europe of today. The medieval ecclesiastics, either through ignorance or bigotry, painted Muhammadanism in the darkest colours. They were in fact trained both to hate the man Muhammad and his religion. To them Muhammad was Anti-Christ. I have studied him — the wonderful man, and in my opinion far from being an Anti-Christ he must be called the Saviour of Humanity. I believe that if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring it the much-needed peace and happiness. But to proceed, it was in the 19th century that honest thinkers like Carlyle, Goethe and Gibbon perceived intrinsic worth in the religion of Muhammad, and thus there was some change for the better in the European attitude towards Islam. [2] But the Europe of the present century is far advanced. It is beginning to be enamoured of the creed of Muhammad.

Being The Part In Which Uncomfortable Questions Are Asked

Firstly, it’s very clear that all online incarnations of this paragraph are hopelessly mashed up. Then there’s the line in [B] — “If any religion had the chance of ruling over England, nay Europe, within the next hundred years, it could be Islam” — which seems to be a tremendous exaggeration and total restating of the line at [C:2]. Secondly, there’s already the fact I mentioned earlier, which is that this particular quote appears absolutely nowhere in the main body of the interview itself. Where did it come from? Did the interviewers specially solicit a statement from Shaw? Under what conditions? Or did they cite it from some hitherto unknown-to-me book that Shaw has written on Islam? Did they simply cobble it together out of things he said later on, over post-interview tea and smokes? Did they…write it themselves?

I have no answers to these questions, and perhaps more qualified scholars of Shaw might be able to point me in the right direction. I don’t really think the interviewers wrote the quote entirely themselves, though, for reasons that involve the line at [C:1]. The internet citations generally cut off right before this line, and looking at it, it’s easy to see why the first person who quoted it might not have wanted to include it. “The world must doubtless attach high value to the predictions of great men like me — that sounds like the sardonic, humorous Bernard Shaw I’m familiar with, but might have sounded a little too much like mockery to his enthusiastic Muslim stenographer. And perhaps it was mockery — why not? Shaw was famously irreverent; just a few years previously he had published a short story on religion which had utterly scandalized even his closest friends. It appears to have involved, among other scandalous things, an actual drawing of Muhammad (which Shaw irreverently exhorts his publisher, John Farleigh, to “keep as handsome as you can, [for] he was a princely genius…By the way, he abhorred images, and took the second commandment au pied de la lettre.”1

Being A Recounting Of The Subject’s Religious Views

Shaw nourished his fascination with religion around the early 1930s with a series of trips around the world, seemingly undertaken in large part to inspect religions in different societies — in Egypt, in Africa, in India, the Far East and Southeast Asia, North America, and at one point even to New Zealand. In 1933 he had this to say about Hinduism and Islam in a letter to the Reverend Ensor Walters:

[In Egypt and India] the apparent multiplicity of Gods is bewildering at the first glance; but you presently discover that they are all the same one God in different aspects and functions and even sexes. There is always one uttermost God who defies personification. This makes Hinduism the most tolerant religion in the world, because its one transcendent God includes all possible Gods…Hinduism is so elastic and so subtle that the profoundest Methodist and the crudest idolater are equally at home in it.

Islam is very different, being ferociously intolerant. What I may call Manifold Monotheism becomes in the minds of very simple folk an absurdly polytheistic idolatry, just as European peasants not only worship Saints and the Virgin as Gods, but will fight fanatically for their faith in the ugly little black doll who is the Virgin of their own Church against the black doll of the next village. When the Arabs had run this sort of idolatry to such extremes [that] they did this without black dolls and worshipped any stone that looked funny, Mahomet rose up at the risk of his life and insulted the stones shockingly, declaring that there is only one God, Allah, the glorious, the great… And there was to be no nonsense about toleration. You accepted Allah or you had your throat cut by someone who did accept him, and who went to Paradise for having sent you to Hell. Mahomet was a great Protestant religious force, like George Fox or Wesley….

There is actually a great Hindu sect, the Jains, with Temples of amazing magnificence, which abolish God, not on materialist atheist considerations, but as unspeakable and unknowable, transcending all human comprehension.2

Shaw was to go on to observe that “before Mahomet and the founder of the Jains were dead in their graves”, the religions they had founded had already begun to ‘backslide’ into polytheism, and “all the Gods and no Gods became hopelessly mixed up, exactly as the Apostles backslid when Jesus was killed”. A decade later, his views on Islam did not seem to have changed in essence from this; and furthermore, his remarks in 1947 show that he had not in fact taken seriously any of what His Eminence had explained to him about the nature of Heaven and Hell in Islam. In the interview, Shaw had asked the Maulana: “[How can you] possibly present the picture of Heaven and Hell, which is portrayed in the Qur’an, in a manner convincing to persons conversant with science, whose minds are inured to accept nothing without visible or palpable proof?” to which His Eminence reeled off a long explanation, relying largely on the usual argument of metaphor, as well as some cutting edge mangling of atomic theory. Shaw largely ignored this, and retained his conviction right up to his 1947 letter to Mabel Annie Stobart that Muslim Hell was something “reinvented by Mohammad”, “a very frightful hell, of disgusting diseases and no houris; [but] the sort of place that the Arabs could understand and believe in; and it put the fear of God into them”.3 Incidentally, he seems also to have retained his deep respect for Jainism.

Given his views on the tendency of religion to ‘backslide’ once deprived of the strong authority figure (and in this one discerns traces of his peculiar respect for Stalin and other fascist dictators) it’s no wonder that in the interview he persistently asks the Maulana whether or not he can be so sure that this is in fact what the Qur’an says, or whether he can be sure that other ‘more orthodox’ or ‘present day’ Muslims would share his balanced views (he asks this at least twice). This probing, despite the genial tone of the whole conversation, is what stays with me, and what makes [C] for me, along with its slightly dubious origins, something I would at the very least hesitate to cite so freely, let alone with such unscholarly wantonness as has been exhibited in its proliferation all over the internet.

Being The Part Where The Fruits Of Wantonness Are Reaped

With such wantonness, unsurprisingly, confusion has arisen. This guy quotes that awfully exaggerated first line in [B] and wonders why Shaw, an atheist, would say that (he didn’t). This reader asks on Yahoo! Answers what Shaw has actually said about Islam, and receives [B] in response, which is voted ‘Best Answer’. This one brazenly claims that Shaw promotes the takeover of England by Islam. This one tries to hunt down a book entitled ‘The Genuine Islam’ by George Bernard Shaw, and is told that the book is probably not a GBS book and is an urban legend. Even Wikiquote is slightly confused.

I hope this post, despite my total lack of Shaw expertise, will go some small way towards helping untangle the confusions, in particular the confusions that arose out of a genuinely critical spirit, but also the confusions amongst so many Muslim websites who have so eagerly adopted him as some kind of speaker for their faith. At the very least, let this be a cautionary tale about poor citation practices. I’m only too pleased to stand corrected by anyone who knows better about Shaw and such things than I do. For those interested, and if you don’t believe me, the periodical is held in the National Library in Singapore and at the New York Public Library. Possibly elsewhere, too.


References
[1] Laurence, Dan H., Bernard Shaw: Collected Letters, 1926-1950 (London: Trustees of the British Museum, 1988), pp. 305-6.
[2] Ibid., pp. 323-3.
[3] Ibid., p. 789.

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35 responses to “Being an Unforgivably Protracted Debunking of George Bernard Shaw’s Views of Islam

  • centurean2

    Checkout, Shaws Book

    Sir Bernard Shaw in The Genuine Islam, Singapore, Vol. 1, No. 8, 1936:

    “If any religion had the chance of ruling over England, nay Europe within the next hundred years, it would be Islam.”
    Why would an athiest like shaw say this ?

    Shaw was also a Fabian, and that is of the greater concern, within the last 70 years islam has been foisted, not only into the UK but Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, .America being a large country, also is in ways being islamnised gradually. sharia finances are being implemented.unlike smaller countries it’s not as noticeable.
    When every town and city, observes mosques growing like mushrooms them Americans will worry.

    Fabian control, across Europe and Western nations, naturally there is concern.
    Fabianism=Marxism
    The Marx Mohammed pact….

  • Jonathan Dresner

    Shaw wrote about Islam elsewhere, as well. My copy is at home, but Adventures of the Black Girl In Search of God casts Islam, as I recall, in a fairly negative light, along with conventional Christianity.

    The only way I could see the quote (any of them, but C in particular) as genuine is if Shaw were satirizing not just Islam (which is described here as rather plastic) but the waffling and partisan nature of European religious hostility/acceptance.

  • Rachel

    @ Jonathan: Yes, the Adventures of the Black Girl in Search of God is the short story I mentioned above — the one he wrote on religion that so scandalized his closest friends (esp. Dame Laurentia, who ended up terminating relations with him for a while). Mohammad features in there as an ‘Arab’ —

    “Know, dog of an unbeliever,” said the Arab, “that images have a power of making men fall down and worship them, even when they are images of beasts.”

    “Or of the sons of carpenters” interjected the conjurer.

    “When I ‘drove the camels” continued the Arab, not quite catching the interruption, “I carried in my pack idols of men seated on thrones with the heads of hawks on their shoulders and scourges in their hands. The Christians who began by worshipping God in the form of a man, now worship Him in the form of a lamb. This is the punishment decreed by Allah for the sin of presuming to imitate the work of His hands. But do not on that account dare to deny Allah. His sense of beauty… [T]he lilies of Allah are more lovely than the robes of Solomon in all his glory. Allah makes the skies His pictures and His children His statues, and does not withhold them from our earthly vision. He permits you to make lovely robes and saddles and trappings, and carpets to kneel on before Him, and windows like flower beds of precious stones. Yet you will be meddling in the work He reserves for Himself, and making idols. For ever be such sin forbidden to my people!”

    “Pooh!” said the sculptor, “your Allah is a bungler; and he knows it…”

    and you’re absolutely right, the book is equally riotous & catastrophic about all religions.

  • DMinor

    Many, many thanks for the post. We had come across the web version of the interview between Siddiqui and Shaw early in our search for the source and veracity of the “Shaw Quotes.” However, there was, maddeningly, no source reference on the site. What was really necessary for accuracy was to have access to the periodical itself, which appears to be rare.

    Since we get quite a few visitors to our blog posts (http://minoroutside.blogspot.com/search/label/the%20Shaw%20quotes) on this topic, we would like to link to this post to finish the series.

    Thanks again for clearing up this mystery.

  • Jonathan Dresner

    Rachel, I missed the link. Lovely to see it online! He really was determined to tweak everyone’s nose that time, wasn’t he?

  • rocketcandy

    I liked reading this very much, especially the short story about the little girl search for God. Thank you Rachel :)

  • Cosma

    A miniscule and pedantic correction to an excellent post – aren’t you debunking an account of Shaw’s views, rather than the views themselves?

  • Rachel

    bah, pedantry! yes, you’re absolutely right. I have a small track record of doing such things: I pour so much of myself into the actual writing that I totally neglect titles and other extraneous logistics. this is, for example, why my MPhil thesis has the most banal title ever, and why I once ran a 24-hour blogging campaign to raise money for an AIDS foundation and called it “idlethink for AIDS” (rather than, say, against it).

  • Rachel

    @DMinor you’re very very welcome! I was heartened to have found your piece on the matter: it was pretty much the only critical examination of the origins of the GBS quote.

  • Yusuf

    What stands out for me as negative is the atmosphere of glee at having by having found/written a very convincing and brilliant article that ‘ups’ one on us muslims as it stands solid in debunking a ‘myth’ about a great man and his affinity to Islam.

    I actually googled ‘Bernard Shaw Islam Quotes’ and found myself here. I’ve read and heard about the man for a long time and wanted to know what the fuss was about.

    I care little for the opinion of any atheist about my religion. What I do care about is the negative stick Islam has been getting everywhere. With all that is happening in the world, I can hardly blame people.

    I like to clear my head of all prejudice and learn about different peoples’ beliefs, views and philosophies on life. I urge all of you, ignore the negativity in the media and try to learn as much as possible about Islam. We do exist, we are practically everywhere, and we are growing by the day.

    We need peace and dialogue in this world. The first step is by understanding one another. Perhaps at some time in the future we might reach a stage of mutualism and symbiosis with the Western world. Mere mockery and negativity will not help.

    Please try to learn and understand about true Islam as I try to understand the world around me. It might seem insignificant to you, but it could be the first step towards dialogue and peace.

    One Love.

  • Rachel

    Yusuf, my gripe with the Bernard Shaw quote has never been out of disdain for Islam, which (being Malaysian and being fond of beautiful books (like the Qur’an)) I know a good deal about, and hold in quite high regard as a religion. My concern was entirely with the wholly unscholarly ways in which the quote was (mis)used on the internet — ways in which it remains unclear, at least to me, that it should have been used. I cite Shaw’s mockery not to endorse his ‘atheistic’ views, but above all as evidence for the claims I have made in this article about the way the quote has been misused, by websites that perhaps have not been scrupulous enough about their sources. I have hopefully used him in a scholarly manner, and I hope my own views on Islam, which are nowhere near as virulent as his, are not wrongly imputed by my doing so.

  • Yusuf

    I probably should get a grip. On second reading the article seems much more transparent for me. Perhaps what got to my head was more the short story you quoted.

    I don’t know a great deal about the history surrounding the quotes, but I do know that it’s quite maddening when something utterly unreliable and/or taken out of context is repeatedly thrown in your face as fact. Based on my reading here, Shaw might as well been using mockery, and I have you to thank for for actually not making a fool of myself using the quotes elsewhere.

    Being as it is now, I shall try to broaden my knowledge on the issue. After all this is just one intepretation that might or might not be what Shaw thinks (it shouldn’t really be too relevant to validate Islam anyway).Thanks for the article.

    • Maya

      Salam Yusuf, thank you for saying what I was thinking. Most Muslims will have similar reaction due to what we receive on a daily basis, and the likely reason is beacuse the message reached your heart first and then processed in your brain later. I too was searching for GBS due to someone quoting it on the facebook, but I wasn’t satisfied with all the quotes until this link, so thank you Rachel too. Yusuf my thoughts are the same we don’t need anyone to validate our faith, it is my choice of religion based on my experience of THE GREAT CREATOR, I validate it myself with Allah’s help
      by studying GOD’s Creations.

  • Rachel

    You’re very welcome, Yusuf. Thanks for stopping by!

  • Buster

    Thanks for this post. I’d run across a number of critical reactions to GBS’s Black Girl in 1930s anticolonial journals and read reviews of some of the response books (it seems to have generated a miniature version of the response to K. Mayo’s Mother India). This post helps put it all a bit more in perspective. Since previously I knew next to nil about GBS.

    Again, great blog.

  • Another Yusuf

    I just want to say Salam and thanks to Yusuf for so beautifully representing the balanced intellectual integrity that is the essence of true Islam. MashaAllah, Yusuf, your beautiful akhlaq, clearly evident in your comments, are an inspiration to me. I have also benefited from this investigation and shall refrain from referencing this quote. Being somewhat familiar with GBS, I have always been a little confused by this quote, because it definitely seems out of character. In fact, I would hesitate in ever using any quote of GBS taken out of context because of his heavy reliance on irony.
    Thanks

  • Yusuf

    Alaykas salam, Yusuf (such a beautiful name, innit).

    Thank you for your very flattering comment. It is always nice to make a positive impression about Islam. Because of the negative publicity it’s being getting everywhere, people are often surprised to realise we do have this balanced intellectual integrity you speak of, which as you say, is the essence of true Islam.

    I’m glad you also benefited from this article. Salam alaykum, and good luck.

  • Zeyana

    Hi Racheal,

    I am a kenyan, Muslim lady, and I absolutely appreciate this article. Someone sent me a forward with various quotes by famous non muslims on Islam and the Pro[phet (PBUH).

    I Learnt a long time ago not to trust everything I read blindly, its important to verify facts and this is an eye opener. Muslims do not need thumbs up from prominent people in history, I mean if you want to believe in the Prophet, then believe in him, dont wait for a nod or a justification, thats not taking a stand.

    Anyway, I am glad that I came across this article, seeking truth is always important

    Regards

    Zeyana

  • Petition of Ignorance « Freedom Ain’t Free & Take Our Country Back

    [...] For more in depth analysis of Shaw’s view of Islam, refer to Being an Unforgivably Protracted Debunking of George Bernard Shaw’s Views of Islam [...]

  • Rafiq Karim

    Some where along the line I came accross that a british poet or may be writer long time ago quoted after his trip round the world or what ever that was asked, Best Thing? Answer Islam, Q….Worst Thing on your finding ? Answer Its Followers, can you confirm, eleborate, ……………………….

  • Kath

    Thanks very much for taking the time to post this! I was quite confused as to Shaw’s views on Islam and religion in general. And it’s good to be reminded to do my research properly x)

  • The Absurd Times Guest Writer — Thoughts and Style That Lasts. « Czar Donic's Blog

    [...] (April 1935), as quoted in The Genuine Islam, Vol. 1 (January 1936), and “Being an Unforgivably Protracted Debunking of George Bernard Shaw’s Views of Islam” (…; Loew states that there are many paraphrased and abbreviated versions of this statement online, and [...]

  • stranger

    “@ Jonathan: Yes, the Adventures of the Black Girl in Search of God is the short story I mentioned above — the one he wrote on religion that so scandalized his closest friends (esp. Dame Laurentia, who ended up terminating relations with him for a while). Mohammad features in there as an ‘Arab’ —”

    I must say, this is the first time I have heard such claim. do you have any proof or is that just your interpretation of what he meant?

  • Andee

    Hi. My name is Andreea. I have been looking for information about Shaw and I came across this. Very interesting to know. I am currently working on my final paper for graduation and I am writing about the woman’s role in Shaw’s plays as well as influences and myths. I am wondering – do you have any tips or ideas? I really look forward to hear from you. You can either leave a reply here or check my blog “Apex” and send me a e-mail to the address from “Contact”. Thanks.

  • Kamran

    Thanks for the post.. it is indeed sad that some “muslims” try to “market” their religion out of every opportunity they get without verifying it.

    Unfortunately, a lot of “muslims” do not really follow what islam has to say about such acts:

    “O you who have believed, if there comes to you a disobedient one with information, investigate, lest you harm a people out of ignorance and become, over what you have done, regretful.” – Surat Al-Ĥujurāt, 49:6.

    The above verse basically means that you must verify every news you get before you forward it.

    As a muslim, I would urge everyone to verify the news before spreading, otherwise such actions can only bring disrespect for the muslims in the minds of intellectuals – who are the main target audience of islam..

  • Dele

    Thanks for this post. i stumbled on this when i was trying to confirm the veracity of the quotes. I have recently discovered that some over zealous Muslims thinks they need lies to back the the truth -just like Paul did in the new testament(Roman 3:7 For if the truth of God has more abounded through my LIE unto His glory; why am I
    still judged as a sinner?”). Islam needs no lies to breathe -it’s the truth. Infact the Prophet Muhammed (PBUH) said falsehood can’t stand the truth, because falsehood, by its nature, will eventually fall.

  • fahima

    I started googling Shaw’s quote because it did seem plausible that some enlightened European thinker might think it very revolutionary to hold such views, but then again, there are so much utter rubish out there. Thank you very much for researching this and straitening things out. I do think there was a hint of ‘glee,’ as Yusuf puts it, in being able to prove a doddering old self-centric muslim scholar as such, but I won’t consider it a judgement on muslims in general … and there is a lot of stuff to be judgemental about indeed.

    I do share his admiration of Jainism, and I agree with the stuff he said about Hinduism. I guess what Shaw was saying about Islam was a lot in reaction to what Europe thought of Islam at that time, and while he was a great improvement, he wasn’t really transcending it after all, for Muhammad (s) remains a merciless, heartless tribal Arab leader in his understanding. Still I’d say it’s always refreshing to find honest critical analysis of something that never recieves an honest critical analysis, not from its adherents, nor from the others. It doesn’t change my respect for the philosophy upheld in my religion, but it’s a schoarly perspective on Islamic history.

  • Ibrahim

    When the truth comes out …

  • Lloyd Miller

    Like the rest of the Fabian Society, George Bernard Shaw wanted to unite mankind into a World Government. Of course, Shaw did not “believe” in Islam, but he saw it as a prime candidate for acheiving ONE WORLD RULE!

  • Lloyd Miller

    Shaw didn’t find value in Stalin, Hitler, and Mussolini for nothing! Shaw WAS MERCILESS with the mankind he despised and wished to herd into a one-world collective!

  • DoseOfFaith

    Hey Rachel,

    Great research, objective and well written. One question that came to mind after going through your article and all the comments: Shaw lived about 14 years after “The Genuine Islam” article was published. Is there any evidence where he refuted what was attributed to him? That would be interesting to find out.

  • Ummer Farooq.

    GBS mentioning Islam taking over England… well it was King John of England who wanted to be a muslim and make England a muslim nation.

  • Indigo Red

    This certainly attests to the lifespan of the independent lie. Today is Sunday, Aug 11, 2013 and this obnoxious Shaw “quote” is again making the rounds. I saw it on my Facebook feed and was immediately skeptical as I always am with quotes attached to photos of famous people. I will not be surprised when next I see the quote with a photo of Morgan Freeman.

    I’m glad you were here to verify my initial feeling the quote is untrue even if Shaw did say or write it in some fashion. A quote out of context, with or without mangling, is, by its very nature, untrue. There’s a reason in US court witnesses are sworn to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

  • Indigo Red

    The article’s link to the referenced interview is broken. Here’s one that’s good today – http://www.scribd.com/doc/61963548/GEORGE-BERNARD-SHAW-on-islam-pdf

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